Silver coins of the Roman Empire

…with a surprising British pedigree!

When one of the most famous of all Roman emperors set foot on what is now British soil 1900 years ago, he was to forge his indelible mark across the very landscape itself. Emperor Hadrian ruled the Roman Empire from 117AD to 138AD and is today remembered for the pivotal role he played in the formation of Rome’s golden age in the 2nd century and he established many of the principles which would ensure Rome’s success for the next 200 years. But at least one of his legacies was destined to last for thousands of years...

Built on the orders of Hadrian following his visit to Britain in 122AD, the wall was constructed by an estimated 15,000 members of the Roman army, taking at least 6 years to complete. The result was a vast fortified Roman military zone stretching 73 miles across Britain. Today, even though only about 10% of the original structure still remains, Hadrian’s Wall is one of Britain’s most famous monuments and certainly the most famous Roman military structure known.

Hold 1900-year-old History in Your Hands

Among all the artefacts from the Roman Empire, there is one with a unique direct link to the past – the coinage of ancient Rome. The authentic coins of Hadrian that have survived to this day will give you chills to hold as you image the Roman soldiers, merchants, and emperors who treasured these coins.

Silver coins such as these were witness to every battle, defeat, triumph, and accomplishment throughout the entire rise and fall of the Roman Empire. As such, they are often found in major museums safely protected behind glass. But these precious museum treasures can also be proudly displayed in your own home!

Order your Original Hadrian Silver Denarius today for just three interest-free instalments of just €97 (FREE P&P)!

By ordering, you have no further commitments and your purchase is protected by The Dublin Mint Office 14-day “no quibble” guarantee.

 

Specifications
Alloy:
Silver
Condition :
Very Fine
Weight:
3.0-3.5g
Diameter:
18-19mm
Circulation :
117AD to 138AD